Traveling Dots, Parabolas, and Elegant Math

Toward the end of last week, I read a description a variation on a paper-folding strategy to create parabolas.  Paraphrased, it said:

  1. On a piece of wax paper, use a pen to draw a line near one edge.  (I used a Sharpie on regular copy paper and got enough ink bleed that I’m convinced any standard copy or notebook paper will do.  I don’t think the expense of wax paper is required!)
  2. All along the line, place additional dots 0.5 to 1 inch apart.
  3. Finally, draw a point F between 0.5 and 2 inches from the line roughly along the midline of the paper toward the center of the paper.
  4. Fold the paper over so one of the dots on line is on tope of point F.  Crease the paper along the fold and open the paper back up.
  5. Repeat step 4 for every dot you drew in step 2.
  6. All of the creases from steps 4 & 5 outline a curve.  Trace that curve to see a parabola.

parabola1

I’d seen and done this before, I had too passively trusted that the procedure must have been true just because the resulting curve “looked like a parabola.”  I read the proof some time ago, but I consumed it too quickly and didn’t remember it when I was read the above procedure.  I shamefully admitted to myself that I was doing exactly what we insist our students NEVER do–blindly accepting a “truth” based on its appearance.  So I spent part of that afternoon thinking about how to understand completely what was going on here.

What follows is the chronological redevelopment of my chain of reasoning for this activity, hopefully showing others that the prettiest explanations rarely occur without effort, time, and refinement.  At the end of this post, I offer what I think is an even smoother version of the activity, freed from some of what I consider overly structured instructions above.

CONIC DEFINITION AND WHAT WASN’T OBVIOUS TO ME

A parabola is the locus of points equidistant from a given  point (focus) and line (directrix).

parabola2

What makes the parabola interesting, in my opinion, is the interplay between the distance from a line (always perpendicular to some point C on the directrix) and the focus point (theoretically could point in any direction like a radius from a circle center).

What initially bothered me about the paper folding approach last week was that it focused entirely on perpendicular bisectors of the Focus-to-C segment (using the image above).  It was not immediately obvious to me at all that perpendicular bisectors of the Focus-to-C segment were 100% logically equivalent to the parabola’s definition.

SIMILARITY ADVANTAGES AND PEDAGOGY

I think I had two major advantages approaching this.

  1. I knew without a doubt that all parabolas are similar (there is a one-to-one mapping between every single point on any parabola and every single point on any other parabola), so I didn’t need to prove lots of cases.  Instead, I focused on the simplest version of a parabola (from my perspective), knowing that whatever I proved from that example was true for all parabolas.
  2. I am quite comfortable with my algebra, geometry, and technology skills.  Being able to wield a wide range of powerful exploration tools means I’m rarely intimidated by problems–even those I don’t initially understand.  I have the patience to persevere through lots of data and explorations until I find patterns and eventually solutions.

I love to understand ideas from multiple perspectives, so I rarely quit with my initial solution.  Perseverance helps me re-phrase ideas and exploring them from alternative perspectives until I find prettier ways of understanding.

In my opinion, it is precisely this willingness to play, persevere, and explore that formalized education is broadly failing to instill in students and teachers.  “What if?” is the most brilliant question, and the one we sadly forget to ask often enough.

ALGEBRAIC PROOF

While I’m comfortable handling math in almost any representation, my mind most often jumps to algebraic perspectives first.  My first inclination was a coordinate proof.

PROOF 1:  As all parabolas are similar, it was enough to use a single, upward facing parabola with its vertex at the origin.  I placed the focus at (0,f), making the directrix the line y=-f.  If any point on the parabola was (x_0,y_0), then a point C on the directrix was at (x_0,-f).

parabola3

From the parabola’s definition, the distance from the focus to P was identical to the length of CP:

\sqrt{(x_0-0)^2-(y_0-f)^2}=y_0+f

Squaring and combining common terms gives

x_0 ^2+y_0 ^2-2y_0f+f^2=y_0 ^2+2y_0f+f^2
x_0 ^2=4fy

But the construction above made lines (creases) on the perpendicular bisector of the focus-to-C segment.  This segment has midpoint \displaystyle \left( \frac{x_0}{2},0 \right) and slope \displaystyle -\frac{2f}{x_0}, so an equation for its perpendicular bisector is \displaystyle y=\frac{x_0}{2f} \left( x-\frac{x_0}{2} \right).

parabola4

Finding the point of intersection of the perpendicular bisector with the parabola involves solving a system of equations.

\displaystyle y=\frac{x_0}{2f} \left( x-\frac{x_0}{2} \right)=\frac{x^2}{4f}
\displaystyle \frac{1}{4f} \left( x^2-2x_0x+x_0 ^2 \right) =0
\displaystyle \frac{1}{4f} \left( x-x_0 \right) ^2 =0

So the only point where the line and parabola meet is at \displaystyle x=x_0–the very same point named by the parabola’s definition.  QED

Proof 2:  All of this could have been brilliantly handled on a CAS to save time and avoid the manipulations.

parabola5

Notice that the y-coordinate of the final solution line is the same y_0 from above.

MORE ELEGANT GEOMETRIC PROOFS

I had a proof, but the algebra seemed more than necessary.  Surely there was a cleaner approach.

Parabola6

In the image above, F is the focus, and I is a point on the parabola.  If D is the midpoint of \overline{FC}, can I conclude \overline{ID} \perp \overline{FC} , proving that the perpendicular bisector of \overline{FC} always intersects the parabola?

PROOF 3:  The definition of the parabola gives \overline{FI} \cong \overline{IC}, and the midpoint gives \overline{FD} \cong \overline{DC}.  Because \overline{ID} is self-congruent, \Delta IDF \cong \Delta IDC by SSS, and corresponding parts make the supplementary \angle IDF \cong \angle IDC, so both must be right angles.  QED

PROOF 4:  Nice enough, but it still felt a little complicated.  I put the problem away to have dinner with my daughters and when I came back, I was able to see the construction not as two congruent triangles, but as the single isosceles \Delta FIC with base \overline{FC}.  In isosceles triangles, altitudes and medians coincide, automatically making \overline{ID} the perpendicular bisector of \overline{FC} .  QED

Admittedly, Proof 4 ultimately relies on the results of Proof 3, but the higher-level isosceles connection felt much more elegant.  I was satisfied.

TWO DYNAMIC GEOMETRY SOFTWARE VARIATIONS

Thinking how I could prompt students along this path, I first considered a trace on the perpendicular lines from the initial procedure above (actually tangent lines to the parabola) using to trace the parabolas.  A video is below, and the Geogebra file is here.

http://vimeo.com/89759785

It is a lovely approach, and I particularly love the way the parabola appears as a digital form of “string art.”  Still, I think it requires some additional thinking for users to believe the approach really does adhere to the parabola’s definition.

I created a second version allowing users to set the location of the focus on the positive y-axis and using  a slider to determine the distances and constructs the parabola through the definition of the parabola.  [In the GeoGebra worksheet (here), you can turn on the hidden circle and lines to see how I constructed it.]  A video shows the symmetric points traced out as you drag the distance slider.

http://vimeo.com/89861149

A SIMPLIFIED PAPER PROCEDURE

Throughout this process, I realized that the location and spacing of the initial points on the directrix was irrelevant.  Creating the software versions of the problem helped me realize that if I could fold a point on the directrix to the focus, why not reverse the process and fold F to the directrix?  In fact, I could fold the paper so that F touched anywhere on the directrix and it would work.  So, here is the simplest version I could develop for the paper version.

  1. Use a straightedge and a Sharpie or thin marker to draw a line near the edge of a piece of paper.
  2. Place a point F roughly above the middle of the line toward the center of the paper.
  3. Fold the paper over so point F is on the line from step 1 and crease the paper along the fold.
  4. Open the paper back up and repeat step 3 several more times with F touching other parts of the step 1 line.
  5. All of the creases from steps 3 & 4 outline a curve.  Trace that curve to see a parabola.

This procedure works because you can fold the focus onto the directrix anywhere you like and the resulting crease will be tangent to the parabola defined by the directrix and focus.  By allowing the focus to “Travel along the Directrix”, you create the parabola’s locus.  Quite elegant, I thought.

ADDITIONAL POSSIBLE QUESTIONS

As I was playing with the different ways to create the parabola and thinking about the interplay between the two distances in the parabola’s definition, I wondered about the potential positions of the distance segments.

parabola2

  1. What is the shortest length of segment CP and where could it be located at that length?  What is the longest length of segment CP and where could it be located at that length?
  2. Obviously, point C can be anywhere along the directrix.  While the focus-to-P segment is theoretically free to rotate in any direction, the parabola definition makes that seem not practically possible.  So, through what size angle is the focus-to-P segment practically able to rotate?
  3. Assuming a horizontal directrix, what is the maximum slope the focus-to-P segment can achieve?
  4. Can you develop a single solution to questions 2 and 3 that doesn’t require any computations or constructions?

CONCLUSIONS

I fully realize that none of this is new mathematics, but I enjoyed the walk through pure mathematics and the enjoyment of developing ever simpler and more elegant solutions to the problem.  In the end, I now have a deeper and richer understanding of parabolas, and that was certainly worth the journey.

The Value of Counter-Intuition

Numberphile caused quite a stir when it posted a video explaining why

\displaystyle 1+2+3+4+...=- \frac{1}{12}

Doug Kuhlman recently posted a great follow-up Numberphile video explaining a broader perspective behind this sum.

It’s a great reminder that there are often different ways of thinking about problems, and sometimes we have to abandon tradition to discover deeper, more elegant connections.

For those deeply bothered by this summation result, the second video contains a lovely analogy to the “reality” of \sqrt{-1} .  From one perspective, it is absolutely not acceptable to do something like square roots of negative numbers.  But by finding a way to conceptualize what such a thing would mean, we gain a far richer understanding of the very real numbers that forbade \sqrt{-1}  in the first place as well as opening the doors to stunning mathematics far beyond the limitations of real numbers.

On the face of it, \displaystyle 1+2+3+...=-\frac{1}{12} is obviously wrong within the context of real numbers only.  But the strange thing in physics and the Zeta function and other places is that \displaystyle -\frac{1}{12} just happens to work … every time.  Let’s not dismiss this out of hand.  It gives our students the wrong idea about mathematics, discovery, and learning.

There’s very clearly SOMETHING going on here.  It’s time to explore and learn something deeper.  And until then, we can revel in the awe of manipulations that logically shouldn’t work, but somehow they do.

May all of our students feel the awe of mathematical and scientific discovery.  And until the connections and understanding are firmly established, I hope we all can embrace the spirit, boldness, and fearless of Euler.

Midpoints, midpoints, everywhere!

I didn’t encounter the Quadrilateral Midpoint Theorem (QMT) until I had been teaching a few years.  Following is a minor variation on my approach to the QMT this year plus a fun way I leveraged the result to introduce similarity.

In case you haven’t heard of it, the surprisingly lovely QMT says that if you connect, in order, the midpoints of the four sides of a quadrilateral–any quadrilateral–even if the quadrilateral is concave or if its sides cross–the resulting figure will always be a parallelogram.

Parallel1

Parallel2

Parallel3

This is a cool and easy property to explore on any dynamic geometry software package (GeoGebra, TI-Nspire, Cabri, …).

SKETCH OF THE TRADITIONAL PROOF:  The proof is often established through triangle similarity:  Whenever you connect the midpoints of two sides of a triangle, the resulting segment will be parallel to and half the length of the triangle’s third side.  Draw either diagonal in the quadrilateral to create two triangles.  Connecting the midpoints of the other two sides of each triangle creates two congruent parallel sides, so the quadrilateral connecting all four midpoints must be a parallelogram.

NEW APPROACH THIS YEAR:  I hadn’t yet led my class into similarity, but having just introduced coordinate proofs, I tried an approach I’d never used before.  I assigned a coordinate proof of the QMT.  I knew the traditional approach existed, but I wanted them to practice their new technique.  From a lab in December, they already knew the result of the QMT, but they hadn’t proved it.

PART I:  Let quadrilateral ABCD be defined by the points , A=(a,b), B=(c,d), C=(e,f),  and D=(g,h).  There are several ways to prove that the midpoints of ABCD are the vertices of a parallelogram.  Provide one such coordinate proof.

All groups quickly established the midpoints of the four sides:  AB_{mid}=\left( \frac{a+c}{2},\frac{b+d}{2} \right)BC_{mid}=\left( \frac{c+e}{2},\frac{d+f}{2} \right)CD_{mid}=\left( \frac{e+g}{2},\frac{f+h}{2} \right), and DA_{mid}=\left( \frac{g+a}{2},\frac{h+b}{2} \right).  From there, my students took three approaches to the final proof, each relying on a different sufficiency condition for parallelograms.

The most common was to show that opposite sides were parallel.  \displaystyle slope \left( AB_{mid} \text{ to } BC_{mid} \right) = \frac{\frac{a-e}{2}}{\frac{b-f}{2}}=\frac{a-e}{b-f} and \displaystyle slope \left( CD_{mid} \text{ to } DA_{mid} \right) =\frac{a-e}{b-f}, making those two midpoint segments parallel.  Likewise, \displaystyle slope \left( BC_{mid} \text{ to } CD_{mid} \right) = \displaystyle slope \left( DA_{mid} \text{ to } AB_{mid} \right) = \frac{c-g}{d-h}, proving the other opposite side pair also was parallel.  With both pairs of opposite sides parallel, the midpoint quadrilateral was necessarily a parallelogram.

I had two groups leverage the fact that the diagonals of parallelograms were mutually bisecting.    \displaystyle midpoint \left( AB_{mid} \text{ to } CD_{mid} \right) = \left( \frac{a+c+e+g}{4},\frac{b+d+f+h}{4}\right) = = midpoint \left( BC_{mid} \text{ to } DA_{mid} \right).  QED.

One student even proved that opposite sides were congruent.

While it was not readily available for my students this year, I can imagine allowing CAS for these manipulations if I use this activity in the future.

EXTENDING THE QMT TO SIMILARITY:  For the next stage, I asked my students to explains what happens when the QMT is applied to degenerate quadrilaterals.

PART II:  You could think of triangles as being degenerate quadrilaterals when two quadrilateral vertices coincide to make one side of the quadrilateral have side length 0.  Apply this to generic quadrilateral ABCD from above where points A and D coincide to create triangle BCD.  Use this to explain how the segment connecting the midpoints of any two sides of a triangle is related to the third side of the triangle.

I encourage you to construct this using a dynamic geometry package, but here’s the result.

Parallel4

 

Heres a brief video showing the quadrilateral going degenerate.

Notice the parallelogram still exists and forms two midpoint segments on the triangle (degenerate quadrilateral).  By parallelogram properties, each of these segments is parallel and congruent to the opposite side of the parallelogram, making them parallel to and half the length of the opposite side of the triangle.

CONCLUSION:  I think it critical to teach in a way that draws connections between ideas and units. This exercise made a lovely transition from quadrilaterals through coordinate proofs to the triangle midpoint theorem.

Optimization in Four Colors

I suspect many (most?) geometry teachers know of the Four Color Theorem (FCT) which roughly states that any flat map, no matter how complex, containing only contiguous regions with finite perimeter can be colored with no more than four colors with the only restriction for coloring being that regions have different colors if they share any boundary beyond a set of finite points. While the FCT is not a particularly useful to cartographers, it has historical significance as the first significant mathematical proof to have been established with extensive use of computers.

THE PROBLEM:  In secondary geometry classes, the FCT is typically just a footnote or factoid, but it is pretty easy to understand for students of all levels.  This year I decided to make it more interesting as an optimization problem.  If each color you use has a different “cost” per area unit, can you color a given map as “cheaply” as possible?

[I considered a maximum cost map, too, and convinced myself that the maximum cost map is just a flip of all the colors, assuming the change in cost is the same between all colors.  With that thought, saving money seemed the more "realistic" goal, so I went with minimum cost.]

MOTIVATIONS:  Perhaps the BEST part of this project was that I was not–and still am not–convinced that we have found THE optimal solution.  I was reasonably certain that I could determine a very good mapping cost, but the sheer number of possibilities would require significant computer run time and coding abilities (just like the original FCT proof!) to ferret out the best answer–resources not available to those solving the problem (the computing problem is an issue my school is actively addressing).  I loved having a problem in math where determined students might best their teacher–and some did!!  I also liked that this project significantly motivated my students to use spreadsheets to track their data–a different math resource than most were accustomed to using.

IMPLEMENTATION:  Experimenting, I decided to offer different versions of the coloring challenge to my 4th-5th grade math club and all of my 8th grade math classes (prealgebra, algebra, & geometry).

Project 1:  Our 8th grade humanities course had an Africa unit earlier in the year, so I returned there by asking all of the students to color this map of Africa.

Africa

We provided this spreadsheet of country names and areas along with these coloring costs:  Purple = $2.00/mi^2, Yellow=$2.50/mi^2, Red = $3.00/mi^2, and Blue=$3.50/mi^2.  After some discussions on the first day, the “border” rule was revised to note that countries whose borders were only large lakes (Democratic Republic of the Congo & Tanzania plus Chad & Nigeria) could be considered “not touching” for this project.

Political incorrectness confession:  We noticed a day after we assigned the project that we had inadvertently left off the relatively new South Sudan. I decided to leave the two Sudans as a single country for this exercise (thus the inked in portion of the map).  Having compromised the previous day on the lake-bordered countries, my error accidentally made the largest and 3rd largest African countries border each other–a nice confounding problem, I thought, for forcing students to determine which would get a cheaper color.

Project 2:  I gave the relatively simpler map of the lower 48 US States to our 4th-5th grade math club with coloring restrictions Red=$1.00, Yellow=$1.25, Blue=$1.50, and Green=$1.75.

USA

RESULTS:  For the submission, students (in ones or pairs) had to submit their colored map, a spreadsheet showing their computations, and 1-3 paragraphs explaining their general coloring strategies, and especially how they handled the inevitable situations where their coloring strategies self-conflicted.  In general, we could have done a better job preparing students for the written portion, but the two most commonly stated strategies were

1. (Low level) We colored the biggest countries the cheapest as far as we could, and then colored the next largest using the next cheapest color, etc.  If we ran into conflicts, we “worked it out”.

2. (Stronger) Noticed after trying the obvious strategy above that the countries colored the 2nd cheapest surrounding a “cheapest color” country often had more area than the “cheapest color” country.  By paying a little more for the largest country, they more than made up for the added expense by coloring a collection of countries that in total had more area.

3. A  few members of my math club addressed some specific strategies like the 11-state ring of US states (MO-IL-IN-OH-WV-VA-NC-GA-AL-MS-AR) surrounding Kentucky & Tennessee made it possible to use just two alternating colors over a large area.

Using our color schemes, excellent scores for the US map were very close to, but just over $1,000,000.  The best Africa map scores we found were just under $17,000,000.  As I noted earlier, I’m not at all convinced that we have found the optimum values, but part of the fun of these projects was that anyone with some calm logic and determination could break through.  My second best coloring scheme was from a student who had been exposed to the least amount of math.  If you can beat these scores, please share.

VARIATIONS:  After playing with this for a while, I’m convinced that all optimal solutions depend on the gap you set between the color costs.  The more expensive the next color is, the more motivation you have to not change colors.  I haven’t tried it, but I think strategy #2 above could be exploited more often if paint color jumps are smaller on a large, complicated map.

I’m also convinced that the initial paint cost is irrelevant.  It will change the total cost of the project, but it would just scale all values up or down.

I didn’t play with different step values in paint cost, but I can see that potentially changing the game, especially if the cost jumps increase as you approach the 4th color.

Enjoy.

Powers of 2

Yesterday, James Tanton posted a fun little problem on Twitter:

2powersSo, 2 is one more than 1=2^0, and 8 is one less than 9=2^3$, and Dr. Tanton wants to know if there are any other powers of two that are within one unit of a perfect square.

While this problem may not have any “real-life relevance”, it demonstrates what I describe as the power and creativity of mathematics.  Among the infinite number of powers of two, how can someone know for certain if any others are or are not within one unit of a perfect square?  No one will ever be able to see every number in the list of powers of two, but variables and mathematics give you the tools to deal with all possibilities at once.

For this problem, let D and N be positive integers.  Translated into mathematical language, Dr. Tanton’s problem is equivalent to asking if there are values of D and N for which 2^D=N^2 \pm 1.  With a single equation in two unknowns, this is where observation and creativity come into play.  I suspect there may be more than one way to approach this, but my solution follows.  Don’t read any further if you want to solve this for yourself.

WARNING:  SOLUTION ALERT!

Because D and N are positive integers, the left side of 2^D=N^2 \pm 1,  is always even.   That means N^2, and therefore N must be odd.

Because N is odd, I know N=2k+1 for some whole number k.  Rewriting our equation gives 2^D=(2k+1)^2 \pm 1, and the right side equals either 4k^2+4k or 4k^2+4k+2.

Factoring the first expression gives 2^D=4k^2+4K=4k(k+1).   Notice that this is the product of two consecutive integers, k and k+1, and therefore one of these factors (even though I don’t know which one) must be an odd number.  The only odd number that is a factor of a power of two is 1, so either k=1 or k+1=1 \rightarrow k=0.  Now, k=1 \longrightarrow N=3 \longrightarrow D=3 and k=0 \longrightarrow N=1 \longrightarrow D=0, the two solutions Dr. Tanton gave.  No other possibilities are possible from this expression, no matter how far down the list of powers of two you want to go.

But what about the other expression?  Factoring again gives 2^D=4k^2+4k+2=2 \cdot \left( 2k^2+2k+1 \right) .  The expression in parentheses must be odd because its first two terms are both multiplied by 2 (making them even) and then one is added (making the overall sum odd).  Again, 1 is the only odd factor of a power of two, and this happens in this case only when k=0 \longrightarrow N=1 \longrightarrow D=0, repeating a solution from above.

Because no other algebraic solutions are possible, the two solutions Dr. Tanton gave in the problem statement are the only two times in the entire universe of perfect squares and powers of two where elements of those two lists are within a single unit of each other.

Math is sweet.

Base-x Numbers and Infinite Series

In my previous post, I explored what happened when you converted a polynomial from its variable form into a base-x numerical form.  That is, what are the computational implications when polynomial 3x^3-11x^2+2 is represented by the base-x number 3(-11)02_x, where the parentheses are used to hold the base-x digit, -11, for the second power of x?  

So far, I’ve explored only the Natural number equivalents of base-x numbers.  In this post, I explore what happens when you allow division to extend base-x numbers into their Rational number counterparts.

Level 5–Infinite Series: 

Numbers can have decimals, so what’s the equivalence for base-x numbers?  For starters, I considered trying to get a “decimal” form of \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2}.  It was “obvious” to me that 12_x won’t divide into 1_x.  There are too few “places”, so some form of decimals are required.  Employing division as described in my previous post somewhat like you would to determine the rational number decimals of \frac{1}{12} gives

Base6

Remember, the places are powers of x, so the decimal portion of \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2} is 0.1(-2)4(-8)..._x, and it is equivalent to

\displaystyle 1x^{-1}-2x^{-2}+4x^{-3}-8x^{-4}+...=\frac{1}{x}-\frac{2}{x^2}+\frac{4}{x^3}-\frac{8}{x^4}+....

This can be seen as a geometric series with first term \displaystyle \frac{1}{x} and ratio \displaystyle r=\frac{-2}{x}.  It’s infinite sum is therefore \displaystyle \frac{\frac{1}{x}}{1-\frac{-2}{x}} which is equivalent to \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2}, confirming the division computation.  Of course, as a geometric series, this is true only so long as \displaystyle |r|=\left | \frac{-2}{x} \right |<1, or 2<|x|.

I thought this was pretty cool, and it led to lots of other cool series.  For example, if x=8,you get \frac{1}{10}=\frac{1}{8}-\frac{2}{64}+\frac{4}{512}-....

Likewise, x=3 gives \frac{1}{5}=\frac{1}{3}-\frac{2}{9}+\frac{4}{27}-\frac{8}{81}+....

I found it quite interesting to have a “polynomial” defined with a rational expression.

Boundary Convergence:

As shown above, \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2}=\frac{1}{x}-\frac{2}{x^2}+\frac{4}{x^3}-\frac{8}{x^4}+... only for |x|>2.  

At x=2, the series is obviously divergent, \displaystyle \frac{1}{4} \ne \frac{1}{2}-\frac{2}{4}+\frac{4}{8}-\frac{8}{16}+....

For x=-2, I got \displaystyle \frac{1}{0} = \frac{1}{-2}-\frac{2}{4}+\frac{4}{-8}-\frac{8}{16}+...=-\frac{1}{2}-\frac{1}{2}-\frac{1}{2}-\frac{1}{2}-... which is properly equivalent to -\infty as x \rightarrow -2 as defined by the convergence domain and the graphical behavior of \displaystyle y=\frac{1}{x+2} just to the left of x=-2.  Nice.

Base7

I did find it curious, though, that \displaystyle \frac{1}{x}-\frac{2}{x^2}+\frac{4}{x^3}-\frac{8}{x^4}+... is a solid approximation for \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2} to the left of its vertical asymptote, but not for its rotationally symmetric right side.  I also thought it philosophically strange (even though I understand mathematically why it must be) that this series could approximate function behavior near a vertical asymptote, but not near the graph’s stable and flat portion near x=0.  What a curious, asymmetrical approximator.  

Maclaurin Series:

Some quick calculus gives the Maclaurin series for \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2} :  \displaystyle \frac{1}{2}-\frac{x}{4}+\frac{x^2}{8}-\frac{x^3}{16}+..., a geometric series with first term \frac{1}{2} and ratio \frac{-x}{2}.  Interestingly, the ratio emerging from the Maclaurin series is the reciprocal of the ratio from the “rational polynomial” resulting from the base-x division above.  

As a geometric series, the interval of convergence is  \displaystyle |r|=\left | \frac{-x}{2} \right |<1, or |x|<2.  Excluding endpoint results, the Maclaurin interval is the complete Real number complement to the base-x series.  For the endpoints, x=-2 produces the right-side vertical asymptote divergence to + \infty that x=-2 did for the left side of the vertical asymptote in the base-x series.  Again, x=2 is divergent.

It’s lovely how these two series so completely complement each other to create clean approximations of \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2} for all x \ne 2.

Other base-x “rational numbers”

Because any polynomial divided by another is absolutely equivalent to a base-x rational number and thereby a base-x decimal number, it will always be possible to create a “rational polynomial” using powers of \displaystyle \frac{1}{x} for non-zero denominators.  But, the decimal patterns of rational base-x numbers don’t apply in the same way as for Natural number bases.  Where \displaystyle \frac{1}{12} is guaranteed to have a repeating decimal pattern, the decimal form of \displaystyle \frac{1}{x+2}=\frac{1_x}{12_x}=0.1(-2)4(-8)..._x clearly will not repeat.  I’ve not explored the full potential of this, but it seems like another interesting field.  

CONCLUSIONS and QUESTIONS

Once number bases are understood, I’d argue that using base-x multiplication might be, and base-x division definitely is, a cleaner way to compute products and quotients, respectively, for polynomials.  

The base-x division algorithm clearly is accessible to Algebra II students, and even opens the doors to studying series approximations to functions long before calculus.

Is there a convenient way to use base-x numbers to represent horizontal translations as cleanly as polynomials?  How difficult would it be to work with a base-(x-h) number for a polynomial translated h units horizontally?

As a calculus extension, what would happen if you tried employing division of non-polynomials by replacing them with their Taylor series equivalents?  I’ve played a little with proving some trig identities using base-x polynomials from the Maclaurin series for sine and cosine.

What would happen if you tried to compute repeated fractions in base-x?  

It’s an open question from my perspective when decimal patterns might terminate or repeat when evaluating base-x rational numbers.  

I’d love to see someone out there give some of these questions a run!

Number Bases and Polynomials

About a month ago, I was working with our 5th grade math teacher to develop some extension activities for some students in an unleveled class.  The class was exploring place value, and I suggested that some might be ready to explore what happens when you allow the number base to be something other than 10.  A few students had some fun learning to use their basic four algorithms in other number bases, but I made an even deeper connection.

When writing something like 512 in expanded form (5\cdot 10^2+1\cdot 10^1+2\cdot 10^0), I realized that if the 10 was an x, I’d have a polynomial.  I’d recognized this before, but this time I wondered what would happen if I applied basic math algorithms to polynomials if I wrote them in a condensed numerical form, not their standard expanded form.  That is, could I do basic algebra on 5x^2+x+2 if I thought of it as 512_x–a base-x “number”?  (To avoid other confusion later, I read this as “five one two base-x“.)

Following are some examples I played with to convince myself how my new notation would work.  I’m not convinced that this will ever lead to anything, but following my “what ifs” all the way to infinite series was a blast.  Read on!

Level 1–Basic Addition:

If I wanted to add (3x+5)(2x^2+4x+1), I could think of it as 35_x+241_x and add the numbers “normally” to get 276_x or 2x^2+7x+6.  Notice that each power of x identifies a “place value” for its characteristic coefficient.

If I wanted to add 3x-7 to itself, I had to adapt my notation a touch.  The “units digit” is a negative number, but since the number base, x, is unknown (or variable), I ended up saying 3x-7=3(-7)_x.  The parentheses are used to contain multiple characters into a single place value.  Then, (3x-7)+(3x-7) becomes 3(-7)_x+3(-7)_x=6(-14)_x or 6x-14.  Notice the expanding parentheses containing the base-x units digit.

Level 2–Advanced Addition:

The last example also showed me that simple multiplication would work.  Adding 3x-7 to itself is equivalent to multiplying 2\cdot (3x-7).  In base-x, that is 2\cdot 3(-7)_x.  That’s easy!  Arguably, this might be even easier that doubling a number when the number base is known.  Without interactions between the coefficients of different place values, just double each digit to get 6(-14)_x=6x-14, as before.

What about (x^2+7)+(8x-9)?  That’s equivalent to 107_x+8(-9)_x.  While simple, I’ll solve this one by stacking.

Base1

and this is x^2+8x-2.  As with base-10 numbers, the use of 0 is needed to hold place values exactly as I needed a 0 to hold the x^1 place for x^2+7. Again, this could easily be accomplished without the number base conversion, but how much more can we push these boundaries?

Level 3–Multiplication & Powers:

Compute (8x-3)^2.  Stacking again and using a modification of the multiply-and-carry algorithm I learned in grade school, I got

Base2and this is equivalent to 64x^2-48x+9.

All other forms of polynomial multiplication work just fine, too.

From one perspective, all of this shifting to a variable number base could be seen as completely unnecessary.  We already have acceptably working algorithms for addition, subtraction, and multiplication.  But then, I really like how this approach completes the connection between numerical and polynomial arithmetic.  The rules of math don’t change just because you introduce variables.  For some, I’m convinced this might make a big difference in understanding.

I also like how easily this extends polynomial by polynomial multiplication far beyond the bland monomial and binomial products that proliferate in virtually all modern textbooks.  Also banished here is any need at all for banal FOIL techniques.

Level 4–Division:

What about x^2+x-6 divided by x+3? In base-x, that’s 11(-6)_x \div 13_x. Remembering that there is no place value carrying possible, I had to be a little careful when setting up my computation. Focusing only on the lead digits, 1 “goes into” 1 one time.  Multiplying the partial quotient by the divisor, writing the result below and subtracting gives

Base3

Then, 1 “goes into” -2 negative two times.  Multiplying and subtracting gives a remainder of 0.

Base4

thereby confirming that x+3 is a factor of x^2+x-6, and the other factor is the quotient, x-2.

Perhaps this could be used as an alternative to other polynomial division algorithms.  It is somewhat similar to the synthetic division technique, without its  significant limitations:  It is not limited to linear divisors with lead coefficients of one.

For (4x^3-5x^2+7) \div (2x^2-1), think 4(-5)07_x \div 20(-1)_x.  Stacking and dividing gives

Base5

So \displaystyle \frac{4x^3-5x^2+7}{2x^2-1}=2x-2.5+\frac{2x+4.5}{2x^2-1}.

CONCLUSION

From all I’ve been able to tell, converting polynomials to their base-x number equivalents enables you to perform all of the same arithmetic computations.  For division in particular, it seems this method might even be a bit easier.

In my next post, I push the exploration of these base-x numbers into infinite series.